Looking Ahead to 2012

It’s the time of year when everyone starts making their resolutions and planning ahead for the next year.  In the gardening world, we’re doing the same thing.  Here are a few things to look out for in 2012:

Each year, the National Garden Bureau predicts an annual, vegetable and perennial to be showcased that are chosen for their popularity, versatility, and simplicity. NGB is predicting 2012 to be the Year of Herbs, the Year of Geraniums and the Year of Heuchera.  All of these have not only been popular for years, but are great plants to grow in our Midwest conditions.

Also on the rise are succulents.  For the past few year succulents have gained popularity for their unique shapes, colors and textures, as well as for being easy to grow.  They do well in shallow containers indoors and can also be used in the new vertical walls that are becoming popular. Succulents will definitely continue to make a splash in the next year.  

Each year, Anthony Tesselaar Plants makes a prediction for the popular colors in plants for the year. They are predicting black and amber to be the big colors of 2012.  This past year, the black petunias became a hit and with the beautiful amber hues of heuchera and other plants available, these colors will be popping up in gardens all over.

A few gardening trends that are going to become even more popular than they were in 2011 are vertical gardening, miniature gardening and edible gardening.  Each of these offers something different for gardeners, and edible gardening is becoming more popular for novice gardeners as well.

In the container gardening world, using unusual items for planters is becoming more and more popular. Gardeners are using everything from watering cans to old soup cans to old boots to decorate their decks and porches with flowers to create a unique look.  Basically, if there’s drainage, their planting in it.

All in all, 2012 is shaping up to be a great year for gardening….now if only the weather would cooperate we will be good to go!

 

Christian Goers