Hours

Monday- Friday:
8:00AM - 5:00PM

Saturday:
8:00AM - 5:00PM

Sunday :
CLOSED

Follow Us
For Email Newsletters you can trust
For Email Marketing you can trust
Follow GoersGreenhouse on Twitter
Follow Me on Pinterest

Tuesday
Feb022016

2016: Year of the Allium

Each year, the National Garden Bureau (NGB) selects an annual, bulb, vegetable and perennial to be showcased. The selected plants are chosen for their popularity, versatility, and simplicity. NGB is predicting 2016 to be the Year of the Carrot, the Year of the Begonia, the Year of the Delphinium and the Year of the Allium.  All of these have not only been popular for years, but are great plants to grow in our Midwest conditions.

This year’s bulb is the allium. These unique flowers give your garden a pop of color that is like something out of a Dr. Seuss book. Ornamental alliums are globe-shaped flowers that rest on the top of green, leafless stalks. Much like your tulips, there are many varieties of alliums that range in height, color and flower size, giving you an allium for any situation in your garden.

Another perk of alliums is that they are deer and rabbit resistant due to the pungent ordo and bitter taste that they release when the animals chew on their foliage. Both insects and animals avoid munching on them, but bees and pollinators love the flowers and their sweet nectar.

The most popular and common alliums are the larger varieties known as “Globemaster” and Gladiator.”  These deep purple, globe-shaped blooms are typically about six inches in diameter and overall grow to be about three feet tall. They put on quite the show in late spring, giving you pops of color you missed during the winter months.

There are other colors available, though the purple is definitely the most popular.  Alliums also come in shades of plum, blue, pink and white.  There are even yellow alliums that bloom midsummer. The bloom color, size, shape and bloom time can all vary depending on which type you plant, giving you endless options for your allium garden.

Believe it or not, alliums are part of the onion family, so if you let your chives go to bloom, they too will get a small globe-shaped flower that looks like a miniature allium. In fact, these non-bulb alliums have been growing in popularity in the past few years. You often see them blooming late summer in gardens alongside rudbeckia, heuchera and mums.

No matter what type of allium you choose to plant, all alliums need good soil drainage. If you are planting the bulb alliums, you will need to get these planted in the fall, preferably in groups.  Other non-bulb alliums can be planted throughout the growing season. Both types like a spot in the garden that has more sun. While your alliums will not bloom all season long, with so many varieties to choose from, you can mix and match your alliums to keep a display going throughout the season.

     

 

Thursday
Jan282016

2016: Year of the Begonia

Each year, the National Garden Bureau (NGB) selects an annual, bulb, vegetable and perennial to be showcased. The selected plants are chosen for their popularity, versatility, and simplicity. NGB is predicting 2016 to be the Year of the Carrot, the Year of the Begonia, the Year of the Delphinium and the Year of the Allium.  All of these have not only been popular for years, but are great plants to grow in our Midwest conditions.

Reiger Begonias

This year’s annual is the begonia. Begonias are very versatile plants that can be used as houseplants, in the shade or in the sun depending on the variety.  There are so many different species available that there is virtually a begonia for every gardening situation.   The only downside of these wonderful plants is that they are annuals in our area.

The most common types of begonias you will see in local gardens, and at Vern Goers Greenhouse,  include Waxed Begonias, Rex Begonias, Reiger Begonias and Non-Stop (Tuberous)  Begonias.  Waxed begonias come in green or red leafed varieties, with small white, pink or red flowers. These do great in sunny areas and can tolerate some shade as well. They need very little maintenance and grow in mounds that are about 8-12 inches in height.

Non-Stop or Tuberous Begonias have very large flowers that range in colors from white to orange to red.  The leaves are fuzzy and the plants do best if kept in shadier areas of the garden. The blooms can be single or double, giving you large spots of color in your shade garden.

Reiger Begonias have a flower shaped similar to the non-stop begonia, but smaller in size.  The plants themselves can grow to be taller than the non-stops and are available in a wide variety of colors, some even being two-toned.  These plants make great houseplants throughout the year and are often given as gifts.  When planted outdoors, be sure to place them in the shade or morning sun, as the leaves and flowers can burn from too much heat and sunlight.

The last variety that is most common in our area is the Rex Begonia. These begonias are known more for their colorful leaves rather than their flowers.  The leaves have various designs and multi-colors on them, and provide extra color for shade spots of your garden or for in your home.

There are other varieties of begonias that we carry from time to time, including Beognia holiviensis that has bright orange, trumpet-shaped flowers that are great for hanging baskets.

No matter the variety you choose, all begonias like well-drained soil and will need to be watered less-frequently during the winter months when they are indoors.  Being that they are tuberous in nature, they can rot easily from over-watering.

No matter the variety you choose, begonias are a great plant for any garden, which is why they were chosen as one of the Plants of the Year for 2016.

 

Waxed Begonias

Wednesday
Jan202016

Celebrating 50 Years in the Goers Family

With 2016 just starting out, Vern Goers Greenhouse is happy to celebrate 50 years of business here in Hinsdale.

The Goers family woud like to take this chance to thank our wonderful customers for helping us reach this huge milestone in our business. For those of you who do not know our story, the Goers family has been in the greenhouse business for four generations.  Phillip Goers, his wife Karen, his son Christian and daughter Sarah currently manage the greenhouse.

Vern Goers grew up working at his father's greenhouse in La Grange, IL.  He eventually went on to start a business of his own and he purchased a small greenhouse in Hinsdale, IL.  The property consisted of a house and three glass greenhouses that were originally built in 1919.  More greenhouses have been added around the original three, since the Goers Family took over in 1966.

With 50 years under our belt, it is always fun to look back at where we came from. Here are a few older photos, and there are new ones posted every Thursday on our Facebook page.

Thanks again and here's to another 50 years!

An early photo of the original greenhouseVern with his poinsettias

A young Phil in the front field  

Phil & Vern taking a break in the kitchen 

The 4th Generation from left to Right: Kim, Christian & Sarah Christian transplanting with Grandpa Vern

 
Sarah watering our geraniumsThe 5th Generation working hard with Grandpa Phil

 

 

Monday
Jan042016

Looking Ahead to 2016

 

      It's the time of year when everyone starts making their resolutions and planning ahead for the next year.  In the gardening world, we're doing the same thing.  Here are a few things to look out for in 2016:

      Each year, the National Garden Bureau (NGB) predicts an annual, bulb, vegetable and perennial to be showcased. The selected plants are chosen for their popularity, versatility, and simplicity. NGB is predicting 2016 to be the Year of the Carrot, the Year of the Begonia, the Year of the Delphinium and the Year of the Allium.  All of these have not only been popular for years, but are great plants to grow in our Midwest conditions.

      Pantone chooses a Color of the Year each year, being a color that will be seen in fashion, interior decorating, and even gardening.  This year, Pantone has chosen two colors, Rose Quartz and Serenity. Rose Quartz is a pastel pink tone and when mixed with the gentle, airy blue Serenity, the colors give a sense of peace.

     The Garden Media Group releases a trend report every year that specifically focuses on trends in gardening for the next year. One of the big trends they see for 2016 is syncing technology with gardening.  From using apps on your phone to new digital tools to sharing your garden on social media, technology is definitely growing into an important part of the gardening experience.

     Part of this technology will also help get the next generation involved in gardening. Increasing children’s participation in gardening and knowledge of gardening is another trend to look for 2016.   

     The Garden Media Group also predicts berries being the next big thing when it comes to edible gardening.  Planting these antioxidant filled & nutritious snacks near your kitchen will give you something new to munch on fresh from the garden. Whether it’s berries or native grasses, planting with a purpose will be a big trend in 2016 as well. Each plant in your garden plays a role in its environment. From pollinators to plants that help with soil retention, creating a garden that supports your natural ecosystem is going to be increasing in popularity.

    Finally, the Garden Media Group’s last prediction for 2016 is an increase in petscaping. Many gardeners have dogs and cats that are members of their family, so creating an outdoor space that is friendly for them will be a resolution for the year.  Creating outdoor pet-friendly sanctuaries by using pet-friendly plants and less chemicals wil give your four-legged friend a place to enjoy.

Whether you start a new trend in 2016, or continue to grow your usual garden, spring cannot come soon enough!

Tuesday
Dec222015

Holiday Hours